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EMPTYRECTANGLE-1-INTRO

[ FLORIDA ]  TIME & SPACE

inside  ]

n  enter

— /!@#$%&/*

the empty rectangle,
and how to fill it.

stone (Caves of Altamira)
canvas (painting)
paper (drawing/collage)
viewfinder (photography)
screen (motion pictures)

1 2 3 …

4 8 12 14 16 18 24 30 36 42 48 60 72 80 

120 230 360 420 630 960

30° 60° 90° 960 X 630 45 X 45 X 45

45°

dave.

“L” is for line

DIVISION / DIRECTION / DIMENSION

90°180°360°

PARALLEL / PERPENDICULAR / PERPETUAL

Pupendicular  b/ Deep Purple

 


— dave.

perpendicular planes at a moment in time and space.

Rule Of Thirds

111 121 1212 131 232 333 

“M”
MATTERS

 

Mondrian (Piet)
1920s
1930s

“Type” b/ Lving Colour

— Piet Mondrian (1923)

Art, Layout, and two-dimensional Design is between you and the empty space you are tasked to fill. Robert Motherwell, one of, if not the first founders of the abstract expressionist movement said “The game is leaving the canvas no less beautiful than when it was empty.

 

Motherwell (Robert)


The London Series (1980)

“The game is leaving the canvas no less beautiful than it was when empty.”

Robert Motherwell

 

First a philosopher. Before devoting his full time to painting Robert Motherwell was a writer and journalist whose work described a time on the verge of a second World War, and often how the ominous atmosphere was moving the World Of Art, moving into what would become a most controversial and volatile move to what would later be called abstract expressionism. Motherwell had travelled to Paris with his father, and was introduced to modernism, an art form born and displayed as European. Motherwell had these visual memories sharp in his mind when he began to express his own visual opinions, and lay the foundation for what became an All-American form of art. Not unlike, at the same time, a form called Jazz, also rearing its often arrogant, American head in the World of Music and Sound.

MILES DAVISTHE BIRTH OF THE COOL (1957)

LED ZEPPELIN — FROM THE BEGINNING, FLYING HIGH (1969)

 

living colour.

 
Motherwell, having invited a number of his European friends and artists into his NYC studio, lived a moment on a Hot Summer Day that well represented the clash of American and European cultures.
The visiting Europeans, who were used to drinking red wine for almost all their beverage desires, were struck by the striking difference in consuming an icy cold, sweet, carbonated Coca Cola, reacted in what could have been described as repulsion. But in his diplomatic and educational way thought to lead them out onto the city street below, where he took them to a nearby vendor, and bought them all a New York hot dog, in a steamed, soft bun, and properly slathered with the brightest yellow, sharp-tanged mustard.
After taking a willing, exploratory, and anticipatory bite, they were unanimously appreciative of the Coca Cola, and immediately understood how it was most appropriate to compliment the unusual American “sandwich.” Most clear in all the revelation, was that red wine would never do.

Robert Motherwell

Matisse (Henri)

Henri Matisse (1952)

Blue Nude II (1952), part of the Blue Nude Series

Peggy Guggenheim: Addicted To Art

 

Man Ray (Emmanuel

— Man Ray

Solarization, Surreal, Women

 

— Man Ray (1959)

“Violin”

 

I’m A Man
b/ Spencer Davis Group


— Leonardo da Vinci

The Vitruvian Man (1485)

 

Woman
b/ John Lennon


— Leonardo da Vinci

The Mona Lisa (1517)

 

— dave.

Cola’s Psychological Contol — Always important in Advertising, Promotion, and Sales was the VISUAL QUALITY in how an organization (Capitalist Institution) presents itself, publicly. Such quality is equally effective in selling a lie, the difference is always in the integrity of the seller, and their motive to pitch whatever (any and all) products.

FASHION / REPUTATION / STYLE / SEX / SALES / PROFIT / PORN / EROTIC ART

Charmin’s Cartoon (Ass-Wiping) Bears
“Constable Bob.”
A Tablet’s Inadequacies,
“The Inability To Wipe”
A NEVERENDING NEED FOR PAPER/A PHYSICAL PRESENCE
UNPLUGGED
VISUAL COMMUNICATION/EMOTIONAL/WITHOUT WORDS.

Coca-Cola: An American History Of Addiction

 

Voyager

— dave.

 

 

prehistoric

geology

palentology

archeology

anthropology

astonomy

geometry
shapes
symbols

logos

letters
alphabet


— LINDA ZACKS

Linda Zacks (Artist, Illustrator, Writer, Poet) drew, photographed, painted, and otherwise constructed the letter “A” as part of an advertising/marketing/corporate identity campaign she had been commissioned to “work” on by the ADOBE corporation.

language
sign language
morse code
visual communication.

In The Beginning ….

Under The Egyptian Sun

THE SHAPE OF THINGS
point • position

line / angle / direction / division / parallel / perpendicular

four equal parts / SQUARE
rule of thirds / TRIANGLE
perpetual line / CIRCLE

Movement, Rhythm & Beat
Language, Lyrics, Melody & Rhyme

SPACE & TIME

Time— Chambers Brothers
Shape Of Things— Yardbirds

size / tone / weight / balance

Balance / Composition

Light In The Black— Rainbow (Before it was Gay)

direction / shadow /dimension
intensity / focus / laser
reflection / refraction
division / prism / separation / CMYK

color (The Separation Of Light)

prism (Glass Pyramid)

 

lens
noun
1.: a piece of transparent material (such as glass) that has two opposite regular surfaces either both curved or one curved and the other plane and that is used either singly or combined in an optical instrument for forming an image by focusing rays of light



The Miracle Of Glass

& THE ABILITY TO SEE
convex / concave

direction / shadow / dimension
Let There Be Light  & Photography

— STONEHENGE (SUMMER SOLSTICE)

Telling Time.
SUNDIAL (THE UNIVERSAL CLOCK)

Navigation / Following The Stars

When You Wish Upon A Star

CHRONOMETER
chro·nom·e·ter| krəˈnämədər | noun
1.: an instrument for measuring time, especially one designed to keep accurate time in spite of motion or variations in temperature, humidity, and air pressure. Chronometers were first developed for marine navigation, being used in conjunction with astronomical observation to determine longitude. (When combined with latitude) accurately pinpointed  the instrument’s Position on The Earth. (GPS)
: TIMEPIECE

I don’t know about you, but by the time the short fat hand of my analog chronometer is on the six, I’m about ready to take the rest of the day off.
— Stanley Bing

: designed to provide sailors the ability to keep time with great accuracy despite any external forces — an ability necessary for 15th and 16th Century sailors to Navigate and Explore the Ocean Covered NEW WORLD.

Invented by self-educated English clockmaker, John Harrison (1693-1776) found the answer to accurate navigation when he invented the chronometer (a friction-free timepiece, impervious to pitch and roll, temperature and humidity), capable of carrying (KEEPING) true time from a home port to any global destination. 

The Art Of Time  b/ Linda Zacks

Symbols / Religious / Logos
Worship The Sun
Devil Moon
Christian Cross
Muslim Crescent Moon
Jewish Star
Nazi Broken Cross
X Marks The Spot
“Twinkle Twinkle Little Star”

 

— Buster O’Connor (VERDEO)

Stonehenge

 

YouTube #1
YouTube #2

OriginalNoise.Org (DEVELOPMENT)
https://www.originalnoise.org/dev/wp-admin
Original Noise Musicians
music.com (magazine designed to accompany a similarly named music website)

 

 

The Egyptian Eye

Ra

NOW YOU SEE ME (MOVIE)

Magic & Illusion
Seeing is Believing
show me,

don’t tell me.

journalism
Telling others what you saw.
communication
visual: smoke signals
audio: drums, conch shells

 

— credit

Now a protected species in the Florida Keys, the Conch is most recognizable by it’s outer shell, with it’s rough exterior, and silky smooth, soft pink walls inside. Important, not only as an interior design element, but also how a young child often “hears the ocean” for the first time, and where a  skilled, Caribbean chef might find dinner, or an inventive percussionist could choose his instrument.  

CALLING LONG DISTANCE

The Conch Republic (/ˈkonk/) is a micronation declared as a (tongue-in-cheek) secession of the city of Key West, Florida, from the United States on April 23, 1982. It has been maintained mostly for its value in promoting tourism to the United States’ southernmost chain of islands, just 90 miles north of Havana, Cuba. Since its creation (inception), the “Conch Republic” has been expanded to include all the Florida Keys (Monroe County), from Key West to Key Largo and ontoto ‘Skeeter’s Last Chance Saloon’ in Florida City, Dade County, Florida, with Key West as the nation’s capital and all territories north of Key West being referred to as ‘The Northern Territories.”

 

MORSE CODE / AUDIO / VISUAL

telegraph

“Telegraph Road” b/ Dire Straits

Developed in the 1830s and 1840s by Samuel Morse (1791-1872) and other inventors, the telegraph revolutionized long-distance communication. It worked by transmitting electrical signals over a wire laid between stations. In addition to helping invent the telegraph, Samuel Morse developed a code (bearing his name) that assigned a set of dots and dashes to each letter of the English alphabet and allowed for the simple transmission of complex messages across telegraph lines. In 1844, Morse sent his first telegraph message, from Washington, D.C., to Baltimore, Maryland; by 1866, a telegraph line had been laid across the Atlantic Ocean from the U.S. to Europe. Although the telegraph had fallen out of widespread use by the start of the 21st century, replaced by the telephone, fax machine and Internet, it laid the groundwork for the communications revolution that led to those later innovations.

Early Forms of Long Distance Communication

Before the development of the electric telegraph in the 19th century revolutionized how information was transmitted across long distances, ancient civilizations such as those in China, Egypt and Greece used drumbeats or smoke signals to exchange information between far-flung points. However, such methods were limited by the weather and the need for an uninterrupted line of sight between receptor points. These limitations also lessened the effectiveness of the semaphore, a modern precursor to the electric telegraph. Developed in the early 1790s, the semaphore consisted of a series of hilltop stations that each had large movable arms to signal letters and numbers and two telescopes with which to see the other stations. Like ancient smoke signals, the semaphore was susceptible to weather and other factors that hindered visibility. A different method of transmitting information was needed to make regular and reliable long-distance communication workable.

The Electric Telegraph

In the early 19th century, two developments in the field of electricity opened the door to the production of the electric telegraph. First, in 1800, the Italian physicist Alessandro Volta (1745-1827) invented the battery, which reliably stored an electric current and allowed the current to be used in a controlled environment. Second, in 1820, the Danish physicist Hans Christian Oersted (1777-1851) demonstrated the connection between electricity and magnetism by deflecting a magnetic needle with an electric current. While scientists and inventors across the world began experimenting with batteries and the principles of electromagnetism to develop some kind of communication system, the credit for inventing the telegraph generally falls to two sets of researchers: Sir William Cooke (1806-79) and Sir Charles Wheatstone (1802-75) in England, and Samuel Morse, Leonard Gale (1800-83) and Alfred Vail (1807-59) in the U.S.

In the 1830s, the British team of Cooke and Wheatstone developed a telegraph system with five magnetic needles that could be pointed around a panel of letters and numbers by using an electric current. Their system was soon being used for railroad signaling in Britain. During this time period, the Massachusetts-born, Yale-educated Morse (who began his career as a painter), worked to develop an electric telegraph of his own. He reportedly had become intrigued with the idea after hearing a conversation about electromagnetism while sailing from Europe to America in the early 1830s, and later learned more about the topic from American physicist Joseph Henry (1797-1878). In collaboration with Gale and Vail, Morse eventually produced a single-circuit telegraph that worked by pushing the operator key down to complete the electric circuit of the battery. This action sent the electric signal across a wire to a receiver at the other end. All the system needed was a key, a battery, wire and a line of poles between stations for the wire and a receiver.

Abraham-Lincoln-Civil-War-GettyImages-515180134

How Abraham Lincoln Used the Telegraph to Help Win the Civil War

cotton-field-in-tucson-az

Cotton Gin / Eli Whitney

Morse Code

To transmit messages across telegraph wires, in the 1830s Morse and Vail created what came to be known as Morse code. The code assigned letters in the alphabet and numbers a set of dots (short marks) and dashes (long marks) based on the frequency of use; letters used often (such as “E”) got a simple code, while those used infrequently (such as “Q”) got a longer and more complex code. Initially, the code, when transmitted over the telegraph system, was rendered as marks on a piece of paper that the telegraph operator would then translate back into English. Rather quickly, however, it became apparent that the operators were able to hear and understand the code just by listening to the clicking of the receiver, so the paper was replaced by a receiver that created more pronounced beeping sounds.

Rise and Decline of the Telegraph System

In 1843, Morse and Vail received funding from the U.S. Congress to set up and test their telegraph system between Washington, D.C., and Baltimore, Maryland. On May 24, 1844, Morse sent Vail the historic first message: “What hath God wrought!” The telegraph system subsequently spread across America and the world, aided by further innovations. Among these improvements was the invention of good insulation for telegraph wires. The man behind this innovation was Ezra Cornell (1807-74), one of the founders of the university in New York that bears his name. Another improvement, by the famed inventor Thomas Alva Edison (1847-1931) in 1874, was the Quadruplex system, which allowed for four messages to be transmitted simultaneously using the same wire.

Use of the telegraph was quickly accepted by people eager for a faster and easier way of sending and receiving information. However, widespread and successful use of the device required a unified system of telegraph stations among which information could be transmitted. The Western Union Telegraphy Company, founded in part by Cornell, was at first only one of many such companies that developed around the new medium during the 1850s. By 1861, however, Western Union had laid the first transcontinental telegraph line, making it the first nationwide telegraph company. Telegraph systems spread across the world, as well. Extensive systems appeared across Europe by the later part of the 19th century, and by 1866 the first permanent telegraph cable had been successfully laid across the Atlantic Ocean; there were 40 such telegraph lines across the Atlantic by 1940.

The electric telegraph transformed how wars were fought and won and how journalists and newspapers conducted business. Rather than taking weeks to be delivered by horse-and-carriage mail carts, pieces of news could be exchanged between telegraph stations almost instantly. The telegraph also had a profound economic effect, allowing money to be “wired” across great distances.

Even by the end of the 19th century, however, new technologies began to emerge, many of them based on the same principles first developed for the telegraph system. In time, these new technologies would overshadow the telegraph, which would fall out of regular widespread usage. Although the telegraph has since been replaced by the even more convenient telephone, fax machine and Internet, its invention stands as a turning point in world history.

Samuel Morse died in New York City at the age of 80 on April 2, 1872.

— 30 —

 

Readin’ and Writin’ — the short-lived benefit of television (on screen communication). A new generation learned to read and write on a screen, first on a desktop computer monitor by the use of a fast-evolving “computer” age.

AND THE DISHONEST, UNETHICAL, CRIMINAL, SOULLESS AMONG US, SO EASILY WILLING TO RUIN THE GAME, (LIE, CHEAT, AND STEAL), RATHER THAN it has deteriorated into a commercial, “SUNDAY, SUNDAY, SUNDAY,” grand opening distraction (more an assault, actually). Inane, “ginormous,” “writ-large,” “lol” abbreviations, and GOD HELP US (EDUCATED, BUT MOSTLY UNARMED) ALL, that has evolved into screaming, EMOJI-FUELED LIES (mimes, tweets, texts, or whatever you fucking (or should I say “freaking,” “frickin’, or whoever the fuck (Rachel Maddow, Joy Reid and (“wait for it”) Brian (“my helicopter got shot”) fucking Williams) YOU CHOOSE TO CALL IT.

FREEDOM OF SPEECH (MALICIOUS?, MANELOVENT?, MURDEROUS?)

INTIMIDATION.

WHEN JARGON TURNS THE UNEDUCATED INTO AN ANGRY, WELL ARMED, INFANTILE, EASILY-INCITED, MURDEROUS MOB.  And what can we do about it? KDT!, and all the other un-American, Vladimir Putin-sucking assholes threatening to KILL US.

“TWO SIDES” b/ Living Colour

“F.O.X” b/ Living Colour

“PROGRAM” b/ Living Colour

WHAT THE FUCK?

THE WONDERFUL WORLD OF LIVING COLOUR

COREY GLOVER — A LIVING CANVAS, VIVID AND BOLD

TRUTH BE TOLD.

WHO (MUTHERFUCKIN’) SHOT YA?

A “TRUE” LOVE OF GUNS, AND HOW EASY THEY MAKE IT TO INTIMIDATE, EXTORT, AND DELIVER THEIR PERSONAL IDEA OF JUSTICE, INCLUDING THE “FREEDOM” TO SO EASILY EXECUTE THEIR MOST DESIREABLE CAPITAL PUNISHMENT.

 

FLA.DAVE.

LIGHTS / camera / FILM

camera

“Every Picture Tells A Story” b/ Rod Stewart

“Photograph” b/ Rod Stewart

“Kodachrome” b/ Rod Stewart

photojournalism: WeeGee / Naked City / John Zorn / “The Public Eye”  w/ Joe Pesci Danny DeVito / L.A. Confidential