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“Chicago Bound Blues”

1930sBessie Smith
Empress of the Blues
((( LISTEN )))

— joe mazzola

Son House
Charley (Charlie) Patton
Muddy Waters
Willie Dixon — With Muddy Waters, one of the two most influential artists in shaping the sound of Post WWII Chicago Blues.

The Mississippi Delta. Where The Blues Was Born.
Before, during, and after the time of Robert Johnson, Blues music has had a connection to Mississippi, and the Delta were the first seeds were planted.

 

“Crossroads”

1975 — Eric Clapton EC Was Here
((( LISTEN )))

 

Wayward Son 
Robert Johnson DECADES AFTER HIS DEATH in 1938, Robert Johnson was barely known. But when King of the Delta Blues Singers (the 29 songs Johnson recorded in 1936 and 1937) was released in 1961, it immediately became Holy Writ for Rock N Roll guitarists and songwriters, including Bob Dylan and all the Yardbirds, including the guitarists, Eric Clapton, Jimmy Page, and Jeff Beck.

“The vibrations from the loudspeaker made my hair stand up,” Bob Dylan said. “The stabbing sounds could almost break a window.” — Bob Dylan recalled hearing King of the Delta Blues Singers for the first time.
Robert Johnson’s ‘King of the Delta Blues Singers
“Ramblin’ on My Mind” / “Traveling Riverside Blues”

 

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Chicago Bound
Muddy Waters — When Muddy Waters was a young boy, he sat at the feet of Charley Patton and Son House, who were in their prime at the time.

Listening and learning from his elders, he was the player who electrified the blues, and pounded his guitar like a drum, and played slide on the low strings, bringing forth his identifiable, deep, guttural moan, that well matched his vocals.

 

 

b/ Derek TrucksI was already a Muddy fan – the Muddy of Chess Records – when I heard his Library of Congress recordings, captured by Alan Lomax in 1941 and 1942. They caught Muddy so young, when he was a complete unknown, maybe self-conscious and shy, listening back to his voice for the first time. There is something vulnerable about it, but also fully formed. For slide players in the Delta, it was a call-and-response thing with themselves. The slide would take the other voice, like a female voice in a choir. Muddy carried it right on through to Chicago.
There are riffs (“Muddy licks”) he would play over turnarounds that were unique to him. You can hear some Muddy licks in Hendrix‘s playing. Later on, as Muddy got older, he played guitar less and less. But when he did jump in, you knew it. He had Buddy Guy and Jimmy Rogers in his bands. But when you played with Muddy, you didn’t play what he did, because that shit was covered.  
“Rollin’ Stone” / “Mannish Boy”
The 100 Greatest Artists of All Time: Muddy Waters
The 100 Greatest Singers of All Time: Muddy Waters
Muddy Waters: 1915-1983

“Born In Chicago”

1965Paul Butterfield Blues Band

w/ Michael Bloomfield (guitar)
((( song )))

— Checkerboard Lounge

Muddy Waters w/ Rolling Stones
@ The Checkerboard Lounge (Chicago)
November 22, 1981 — In the middle of their American Tour, The Rolling Stones arrived three days early and did a three-night stand at Chicago’s Rosemont Horizon Hotel, before the scheduled show that weekend.

Long influenced by the Chicago blues, the band paid a visit to Buddy Guy’s club the Checkerboard Lounge to see the legendary bluesman perform. It didn’t take long before Mick Jagger, Keith Richards, Ronnie Wood and Ian Stewart were joining in on stage and later Buddy Guy and Lefty Dizz also played their part.

It was a unique occasion that was fortunately captured on camera.
Now, restored from the original footage and with sound mixed and mastered by Bob Clearmountain, this amazing blues night is being made available in an official release for the first time.

JAZZIZ — (SOUTHSIDE CHICAGO CLUB PHOTOGRAPHS, INCLUDING LEFTY DIZZ)

Michael Bloomfield

Oblighetto

1991A Tribe Called Quest
The Low End Theory
((( song )))

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Chester Arthur Burnett
Howlin’ Wolf (Chester Arthur Burnett) was a Chicago blues singer, guitarist, and harmonica player. Originally from Mississippi, he made his biggest musical strides after moving to Chicago in (?)It was there, at the north end of the Underground railroad, where his musical rivalry with Muddy Waters began.

With a booming voice and imposing physical presence, Howlin’ Wolf was, and remains one of the most dynamic and memorable of the Chicago blues artists.

The musician and critic Cub Koda noted, “no one could match Howlin’ Wolf for the singular ability to rock the house down to the foundation while simultaneously scaring its patrons out of its wits.” Producer Sam Phillips recalled, “When I heard Howlin’ Wolf, I said, ‘This is for me. This is where the soul of man never dies.'”[2] Several of his songs, including “Smokestack Lightnin’“, “Killing Floor” and “Spoonful“, have become blues and blues rock standards. In 2011, Rolling Stone magazine ranked him number 54 on its list of the “100 Greatest Artists of All Time.”

“FUCK OFF” — Howlin’ Wolf to Lowell George (Little Feat/Frank Zappa) at the Santa Monica Civic Center (1974).

 

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Buddy Guy
Buddy Guy got used to people calling his guitar style a bunch of noise – from his family back in rural Louisiana, who chased him out of the house for making a racket, to Chess Records heads Phil and Leonard Chess, who, he says, “wouldn’t let me get loose like I wanted” on sessions with Muddy WatersHowlin’ Wolf and Little Walter. But as a new generation of rockers discovered the blues, Guy’s fretwork became a major influence on titans from Jimi Hendrix to Jimmy Page. Guy’s flamboyant playing – huge bends, prominent distortion, frenetic licks – on such classics as “Stone Crazy” and “First Time I Met the Blues,” and his collaborations with the late harp master Junior Wells, raised the standard for six-string fury. His showmanship, complete with mid-solo strolls through the audience, remains electrifying at age 75. “He was for me what Elvis was probably like for other people,” said Eric Clapton at Guy’s Rock and Roll Hall of Fame induction in 2005. “My course was set, and he was my pilot.”

w/ Vernon Reid (Lightning In A Bottle)

“Stone Crazy” / “First Time I Met the Blues”
Damn Right, He’s Buddy Guy
Rock and Roll Hall of Fame 2005: Buddy Guy

 

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Bo Diddley
“It’s the mother of riffs,” says guitarist Johnny Marr, the “Bo Diddley Beat,” introduced by the Chicago guitarist born Ellas Otha Bates, a.k.a. Diddley. Driven by his tremoloed guitar, songs such as “Mona” and “Bo Diddley” unleashed a super-powered version of a WEST AFRICAN GROOVE THAT WAS HANDED DOWN BY SLAVES. After Diddley, the riff would be hijacked by everyone from Buddy Holly to the Rolling Stones (who covered “Mona” in 1964), and, later, garage rockers and punks, who responded to its raw simplicity. (The Clash made the connection formal when they brought him on tour in 1979; the Smiths built “How Soon Is Now?” around the riff.) “Anybody who picked up the guitar could do it,” says Dan Auerbach of the Black Keys. “If you could keep a beat, you could play Bo Diddley.” “His style was outrageous,” Keith Richards said; it suggested “that the kind of music we loved didn’t just come from Mississippi. It was coming from somewhere else.”
“Bo Diddley” / “Road Runner” / “Who Do You Love?”
The 100 Greatest Artists of All Time: Bo Diddley
Bo Diddley: The Rolling Stone Interview

 

Ladell McLin

1965 — “Born In Chicago”
Paul Butterfield Blues Band
((( LISTEN )))

 

 

Oblighetto

1991A Tribe Called Quest
The Low End Theory
((( LISTEN )))

— Alan Lomax

Muddy Waters w/ Rolling Stones
@ The Checkerboard Lounge (Chicago)
November 22, 1981 — In the middle of their American Tour, The Rolling Stones arrived three days early and did a three-night stand at Chicago’s Rosemont Horizon Hotel, before the scheduled show that weekend.

 

— Checkerboard Lounge

Long influenced by the Chicago blues, the band paid a visit to Buddy Guy’s club the Checkerboard Lounge to see the legendary bluesman perform. It didn’t take long before Mick Jagger, Keith Richards, Ronnie Wood and Ian Stewart were joining in on stage and later Buddy Guy and Lefty Dizz also played their part.

It was a unique occasion that was fortunately captured on camera.
Now, restored from the original footage and with sound mixed and mastered by Bob Clearmountain, this amazing blues night is being made available in an official release for the first time.

JAZZIZ — (SOUTHSIDE CHICAGO CLUB PHOTOGRAPHS, INCLUDING LEFTY DIZZ)

 

 

Otis Rush
In Chicago in the sixties, “the rules had been laid down” for young, white blues bands, Mike Bloomfield told Rolling Stone in 1968. “You had to be as good as Otis Rush.” That wasn’t easy. A Mississippi native who moved to the Windy City in the late Forties, Rush was a fearsome electric guitarist – with a grittytreble tone and lacerating attack, like a gunslinging cross of Muddy Waters and B.B. King – as well as a knockout songwriter. Along with guitarists like Magic Sam and Buddy Guy, Rush helped create the more modernized, R&B-influenced approach to Chicago blues that came to be known as the West Side Sound. Rush’s impact on later generations was enormous: His late-Fifties and early-Sixties singles were go-to covers for Led Zeppelin (“I Can’t Quit You Baby”), John Mayall (“All Your Love [I Miss Loving]”) and the J. Geils Band (“Homework”), while Stevie Ray Vaughan named his band after Rush’s lethal ’58 lament “Double Trouble.”
“I Can’t Quit You Baby” / “Double Trouble” / “Homework”

 

Lowell George (Little Feat)

Lowell Thomas George  — An American singer, songwriter, multi-instrumentalist, and producer, who was the primary guitarist, vocalist, songwriter and founder/leader for the rock band Little Feat. (w/Frank Zappa) Bill Payne (piano/Hammond B3) Jon Lord (Deep Purple) Chuck Leavell.

 

 

A Florida Journalist, Photographer, and Art Director with an eclectic client list of individuals and organizations with musical, visual, educational, and editorial interests.

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