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(1849-1949)-FLORIDA

 

[ Fla. ]

Age

(1849-1949) 

1850sUncle Tom’s Cabin
1860s“CIVIL” WAR (AMERICA’S DIVIDE)
1870sBrooklyn Bridge

First To Imagine Florida

Idea Man

Thomas A. Edison, an inventor with a resume that includes the light bulb (now a symbol), the phonograph, and motion pictures.
Henry Morrison Flagler — Florida Rail Road Barron
John D. Rockefeller — Standard Oil w/Flagler
Henry Ford — Automotive (Model-T) Pioneer
Harvey S. Firestone — Ford’s Automotive Partner
Carl Fisher — Indianapolis Speedway, Lincoln Highway, Mr. Miami Beach
George EastmanKodak No 1.

Silver Springs, Florida
(1907) Postcard

1885 — Thomas A. Edison started spending his winters in Fort Myers, where he built a laboratory where he continued his numerous scientific and technological experiments, in his addition to managing a small rubber plantation at the heart of his botanical research. Information relevant to his friend Harvey Firestone, who he saw often in Ormond Beach at his friend Henry Morrison’s hotel. Also frequent participants in these Guilded Age social gatherings were Henry Ford and …

 

1880sThe Gilded Age
Railroad Barrons, New York City Skyscrapers, and taking pictures. Kodak No.1
1881— Tombstone, Arizona, Gunfight at the O.K. Corral. U.S. Congress bans Chinese immigrants from entering the U.S. for ten years. Sitting Bull
1882 — Orient Express begins running between Paris and Constantinople (
1883 — George Eastman introduces the Kodak No.1

john t. daniels
The Wright Brothers (Orville and Wilbur)

1890s

First to Fly
1900s
FLORIDA HISTORY 
AMERICAN HISTORY

 

(Photograph b/ Hulton Archive/Getty Images)

Henry Morrison Flagler (holding hat in circle) greets a crowd upon his arrival on the first train into Key West, Florida, January 22, 1912. Flagler built the Florida East Coast Railway as a way of linking his string of hotels and other properties in Florida, finally stretching the railway across seven miles of open water in into Key West, the southernmost point in the United States.

1910s

1912  — The Overseas Railroad opens: the first train arrives in Key West, Florida, at 10:43 a.m. with Henry M. Flagler, the railroad’s creator and owner, aboard. Oreo cookies introduced. RMS Titanic, Fenway Park, home of the Boston Red Sox. Suffragettes and their supporters parade in New York City. President Theodore Roosevelt is shot by saloonkeeper John Schrank. U.S. presidential election, 1912: Democratic challenger and Governor of New Jersey Woodrow Wilson wins a landslide victory over Republican incumbent William Howard Taft. Taft’s base is undercut by the Progressive Party candidate (and former Republican) Theodore Roosevelt, who finishes second, ahead of Taft. W. C. Handy publishes his “Southern rag” The Memphis Blues.” The Columbia University Graduate School of Journalism is founded in New York City. The University of Florida publishes the first edition of its student newspaper, The Florida Alligator.
1913 — Anderson Hall, Peabody Hall (University of Florida), Pensacola Naval Air Station, Joe’s Stone Crab, Venetian Causeway.


1900
1901
1902
1903
1904
1905 — Speed Quest On The Sand
Ormond Beach
1906
1907
1908Model-T (Tin Lizzie)
1909 — 
1910  — 
1911  
1912  — 
1913
1914
1915
1916Prohibition In Florida: In 1916, Florida became the only state to elect a Prohibition Party candidate for governor, Sidney J. Catts. One year later, voters mandated statewide prohibition in advance of the Eighteenth Amendment. Race and gender mores also shaped and were shaped by the temperance movement.
1917
1918
1919PROHIBITION (Florida, Rum Runners, Miami, Havana, Cuba, Bahamas, Key West, (Bacardi / Cane) “The Real McCoy,” Jacksonville.
Ziegfeld Girls were the chorus girls featured in Florenz Ziegfeld‘s Broadway revue. Theatrical Spectaculars, Ziegfeld Follies produced in New York City between 1907–1931. The revues were based on the Folies Bergère of Paris.

“Moon Over Miami”
Ray Charles
The Genius Hits The Road
1960 “Hit The Road Jack,” on the same album became theme song for John F. Kennedy, who was the Democrat running against Richard Nixon in the 1960 United States Presidential Election.

((( back & forth )))

dave.
1920s FLORIDA 

The Roaring 20s
1920 Red Scare, Babe Ruth traded to Yankees, The Human Fly climbs the Woolworth building in NYC …
January 13, 1920 — The New York Times ridicules the American rocket scientist Robert H. Goddard.
July 17, 1969 — as the Apollo 11 crew head to the Moon, the newspaper will retracts the 50-year-old editorial. Still an honest journalistic institution, the New York Times. Listen, and appreciate it.

PROHIBITION
Eighteenth Amendment to the U.S. Constitution
AND … The ACLU, Oahu sugar strike of 1920, Pro Wrestling at Madison Square Garden, The League of Women Voters, Zeta Phi Beta Sorority (Inc.) is founded on the campus of Howard University in Washington D.C., United States Congress refuses to ratify the Treaty of Versailles, The first game of the Negro National League baseball is played in Indianapolis, Indiana, During the 1920 Republican National Convention in Chicago, party leaders gather in a “smoke-filled room” of The Blackstone Hotel to decide their presidential candidate, The U.S. Post Office rules that children may not be sent via parcel post, Cherokee National Forest is established, 1920 Duluth lynchings, Inglewood earthquake, Lynching of Irving and Herman Arthur in Paris, Texas, NFL, Nineteeth Amendment, Woman’s Suffrage, The Wall Street bombing: a bomb in a horse wagon explodes in front of the J. P. Morgan Building in New York City, First domestic radio sets come to stores in the U.S. – Westinghouse radio costs $10, Republican U. S. Senator Warren G. Harding defeats Democratic Governor of Ohio James M. Cox in the U.S. presidential election, the first national U.S. election in which women have the right to vote, OCOEE MASSACRE, Black Cross Nurses, Van Wyck Brooks publishes The Ordeal of Mark Twain, arguing that Twain’s genius was twisted by the conditions and culture of late 19th-century America. This begins a reassessment of Twain, who has been seen hitherto mainly as a humorous entertainer.

Religion v. Everything
Prohibition 
Mob Rule (The Godfather) 
Babe Ruth, Suffragettes, Spirit of St. Louis …

1921Tulsa Massacre
1922
1923 — The first issue of Time magazine is published. The Rosewood Massacre (Cedar Key), a racially motivated massacre of black people and the destruction of a black town, takes place in Rosewood, Florida. Louis Armstrong makes his first recording, “Chimes Blues”, with King Oliver‘s Creole Jazz Band. The first Yankee Stadium opens its doors in the Bronx, New York City. Riegelmann Boardwalk at Coney Island officially opened. The Ku Klux Klan defies a law requiring publication of its members. Roy and Walt Disney found The Walt Disney Company. The Hollywood Sign is inaugurated in California (originally reading Hollywoodland). Illustrated Daily News first published in Los Angeles by Cornelius Vanderbilt IV. Vice President Calvin Coolidge becomes the 30th president of the United States, upon the death of President Warren G. Harding.
1924
1925
1926
1927 — Pan American Airways (PAN AM) Miami
1928
1929The Crash
STOCK MARKET CRASH 1929
And Then Came God, Guns, and Depression


Hollywood Swingin’

HOLLYWOOD BC

Before the Christian “Code,” movies made in Hollywood were more suggestive and risque. Mae West embodied the Pre-Code Attitude … Sarcastic, Sexy, and Sizzling Hot.

— yZ.

(In Florida)
1930s  — Hollywood used the Central Florida jungle to depict Africa in its movies. Much of MGM’s “Tarzan” series was shot at Silver Springs and Weeki Wachee. Amelia Earhart departed Miami, on the second leg of her attempt to circumnavigate the globe. Days later, communication was lost, and Earhart was never seen again.
30s The Winds Of War
NAZI RISINGHitler Hindenburg
Berenice Abbott (NYC)
Dust Bowl
Grapes Of Wrath
Dorothea Lange (WPA)
1930
1931
1932
1933 — 
1934
1935

(Quest for Speed)
1936Ormond Beach, just north of Daytona was home to one of Henry Morrison Flagler‘s legendary hotels, part of a string that ran down Florida’s East Coast (Railway).  It was there, in the 1930s, where Flagler would entertain friends, drinking Old Fashioned on the veranda, and discussing business. Those friends included his Standard Oil partner, John D. Rockefeller, Henry Ford, Harvey Firestone, and Thomas Edison. All of whom were keenly interested in the auto racing on Ormond’s, wide, hard-packed, smooth beach was ideal for those whose life-long quest was for speed.

(The Flying Feminist) 
1937Amelia Earhart (June 1) departed Miami  on what would be her last flight. She and her navigator, Frank Noonan, disappeared somewhere in the South Pacific Ocean, near Japan. Earnhart was in the middle of an ambitious and perilous attempt to circumnavigate the globe in her Lockheed 10-E Elektra. Throughout the flight, Earhart was not only the pilot, but also a journalist who sent regular dispatches to the Miami Herald for publication in its daily newspaper. (Hindenburg)
1938The Winds Of War
Night & Day
1939 — Summer In The City
Harlem Nocturne written by Earle Hagen (music) and Dick Rogers (lyrics) for the Ray Noble Orchestra, of which they were members is a song that became one of the most popular Jazz “standards,” covered by hundreds, if not thousands of bands and musicians (purveyors of Jazz). 
((( uptown )))

“harlem couple” b/ james van der zee (1932)

1939 The Grapes of Wrath is an American realist novel written by John Steinbeck and published in 1939. The book won the National Book Award and Pulitzer Prize for fiction, and it was cited prominently when Steinbeck was awarded the Nobel Prize in 1962.

1940sWorld At War (Again)
WWII

Yz.

America prepares for War (Bombers over Liberty), WPA, Dust Bowl, Oklahoma, Dorothea Lange, Moonrise by Ansel Adams, American Gothic, Gordon Parks, Neon Desert, Las Vegas (1950)

1940
1941 — December 7th Pearl Harbor Hawaii
“A Date That Will Live In Infamy.”
Ziegfeld Girl (1941)
1942 — “American Gothic” Gordon Parks
1943 — BIG BAND SWING
1944 — D-Day (June 6) The Longest Day
1945
1946
1947 — Jackie Robinson (Rookie of The Year)
1948
1949

1950s

Atomic Mouse  
Good Night and Good Luck Edward R. Murrow (2005)
Abstract Expressionism
Walt Disney

“Itsy Bitsy Teenie Weeni …
Yellow Polka Dot Bikini”
Brian Hyland
Single (45) 
((( island music )))

1950
1951
1952
1953
1954“Fly Me To The Moon” (originally “In Other Words”) by Bart Howard. The first recording of the song was made in 1954 by Kaye Ballard.
1955 — Elvis Presley (Black & White) Jackie Robinson (World Series) Elvis (or) Big Mama Thornton. Louis Armstrong, Herb Alpert, The Beatles, a Hard Day’s Night, Rockets To The Moon (Alice).
1956 — Around The World In 80 Days 
1957 — ’57 Chevy (tailfins)
1958 Explorer 1
Explorer 1 was the first satellite launched by the United States in 1958 and was part of the U.S. participation in the International Geophysical Year (IGY). The mission followed the first two satellites, both launched by the Soviet Union during the previous year, Sputnik 1 and Sputnik 2. This began a Space Race during the Cold War between the two nations.

1959NASA
NASCAR (Daytona 500)

 

Tony Rome Jackie Gleason Arthur Godfrey Jerry Lewis Esther Williams  Johnny Weismuller Whitey Ford Mark Stein Pink Panther Henry Mancini Marilyn Manson Scott Putesky  Jimmy Page Madonna Lenny Kravitz Will Smith Prince …

When Miami Beach Was Hot 
Fontainebleau Hotel
Rat Pack

1959NASA
NASCAR (Daytona 500)

The Original 7 American Astronauts 
1960
Mercury

1961
1962 
1963
1964
1965
1966 — Gemini 
1967 Apollo
1968

1969 — APOLLO 11
“One Small Step for Man, One Small Step for Mankind” VIETNAM
WOODSTOCK

Viva Las Vegas
Sun Sand & Moon

Explorer 1
Explorer 1 was the first satellite launched by the United States in 1958 and was part of the U.S. participation in the International Geophysical Year (IGY). The mission followed the first two satellites, both launched by the Soviet Union during the previous year, Sputnik 1 and Sputnik 2. This began a Space Race during the Cold War between the two nations.

1959NASA
NASCAR (Daytona 500)

“Destination Moon”
Dinah Washington

Dinah ’62 
((( Space Coast Dreaming )))

Night & Day (NYC)
Moon & Sun
Harlem Nocturne written by Earle Hagen (music) and Dick Rogers (lyrics) for the Ray Noble Orchestra, of which they were members is a song that became one of the most popular Jazz “standards,” covered by hundreds, if not thousands of bands and musicians (purveyors of Jazz) 1939 
((( uptown )))

A Great Day In Harlem b/ Art Kane (Esquire)

“Great Day In Harlem”
One day in what’s called “The Golden Age Of Jazz,” a momentous gathering of musicians was preserved, and now stands as an important document in America’s musical history.
1958 “A Great Day In Harlem” or “Harlem 1958” is a black and white photograph of 57 Jazz musicians who had gathered at 17 East 126th Street between Fifth and Madison Avenue in Harlem, New York City. The picture was taken by freelance photographer Art Kane for Esquire magazine, and was published in Esquire’s January 1959 issue.

 

 

 

 

A Florida Journalist, Photographer, and Art Director with an eclectic client list of individuals and organizations with musical, visual, educational, and editorial interests.

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