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ALLIGATOR-OPINIONS-UFLAGS

alligator


EDITOR:
The Greeks Don’t Want No Freaks

friday
march 19, 1982
vol 75 no 129

 alan ferguson

no ifs, ands, or butts

Even Sigma Phi Epsilon fraternity wisecrackers bare their opinions about the recent controversy over the pending removal of the UF Lesbian and Gay Society from its Reitz Union office. UFLAGS is scheduled to be evicted from its office today, but members plan to appeal to the Board of Regents.

Maybe one of the most discussed and debated editorial decisions since Ron Sachs printed “The List” of abortion providers in 1971. Ten years after, it was General Manager Ed Barber making such decisions, NOT THE UNIVERSITY. As always, Ed expressed his feeling about publishing the picture, and thoughtfully laid out what he thought would be the consequences, including that the paper would surely lose grocery store ads (mayber all), and such a loss would be significant. In the end, as always, Ed exercised no authority over the editorial staff, and he didn’t stand in the way of (or threaten to arrest) editor Robert McClure deciding to print the photograph of the Greek assholes, who were known all around Gainesville.

Scroll down to letters (to the editor) written by a number of UF students who thought the Alligator was wrong to print the picture, and accussed the paper as much as the fraternity brothers for the vulgar display.

 

don wright

Alligator Cartoonist Don Wright, was at the Miami News in 1982, when Central American began to occupy much of the National and World news. Wright always had his Pulitzer Prize way of telling a big story in a graphically quick way, and always adding words to emphasize his often sarcastic, criticism, humor, and wit. Ater No Nukes, Oil, Hostages, and Iran, The United States, under Ronald Reagan’s control, turned its attention to Central America. As usual, Wright was ahead of the game, and saw trouble coming.

On the second Opinions page, Rice, the syndicated cartoonist, reminded us  of Reagan and wife Nancy’s “Just Say No” war against drugs.  He depicts John Belushi, who had died two weeks earlier (March 5, 1982), as one who missed (or wasn’t listenting to) the anti-drug message.

 dave hogerty

Show offs

Like prostitutes in Amsterdam’s “red-light” district, these bare breasted, Pike fraternity brothers were outside their plantation style house on University Avenue, sunning themselves, and letting all who passed by what was hidden inside.

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